How To Get Candle Wax Out Of Carpet

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Holiday and birthday celebrations don’t have to end on a sour note once you know how to get candle wax out of carpeting and rugs. These tips work to remove wax from tablecloths and clothing, too.

Although the list of things you need looks long at first, some of the items may be unnecessary for smaller wax spills or for those from pale-colored candles. One thing you do need, no matter how big or small the spot, is patience.

How To Get Candle Wax Out Of Carpeting

You will need:

  • A table knife
  • Several ice cubes
  • A plastic bag
  • A vacuum cleaner
  • Three or four brown paper bags cut in pieces large enough to cover the spill
  • An iron
  • Rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol 70% (surgical spirits in the UK)
  • Several white cloths
  • Plain household ammonia (maybe)

Step 1: Remove the Surface Wax.

  • Using the table knife, get as much candle wax out of the carpet as you can. Don’t be brutal about this: you don’t want to tear out carpet fibers, just get out excess wax so the rest of the steps are easier.
  • Next, place a few ice cubes in the plastic bag and set this over the stain to harden any remaining wax.
  • Wait a couple of minutes, then remove the ice pack and use the knife to pry up more wax.

Step 2: Vacuum the Spot.

Use the upholstery attachment to do this. Work toward the base of the fibers in every direction to lift and get the hardened bits of candle wax out of the carpet.

Step 3: Liquefy the Remaining Wax.

  • Turn the iron to its lowest setting without steam.
  • Place a piece of the brown paper bag over the candle wax spill. Run the iron over the paper, keeping it in constant motion.
  • Stop as soon as you begin to see wax seep into the paper. Change to a clean paper and repeat until you don’t get any more up.

Step 4: Repeat.

  • There is probably still some remaining wax that has now melted, so scrape it away with the dull edge of the knife. Place more ice cubes on the spot to harden remaining wax and pry it up with the knife.
  • Repeat this process as needed until you do not see any remaining chunks or drops of wax.

Step 5: Get rid of the stain.

  • To get rid of any stain left from the wax, pour a tiny amount of rubbing alcohol on one of the white cloths.
  • Dab at the stain. DO NOT RUB OR SOAK THE AREA!
  • You will need to change to a fresh rag repeatedly as the coloring transfers from your carpet to the fabric.

Step 6: Is the stain STILL there?

NOTE: Open the windows, because rubbing alcohol combined with ammonia creates smelling salts. It’s not going to hurt you, but it does stink.

  • Turn on your iron’s steam setting. Dab or spray the stain with some ammonia then place a white rag over the spot and run the iron over it. Be sure to keep the iron in constant motion.
  • After a few passes, you’ll see the stain transfer to the fabric. Change cloths.
  • Repeat until the stain is gone.

Step 7: Finish the job.

Clean the area with cool water to remove the ammonia. Let it dry thoroughly and then vacuum.

Pin How to Get Candle Wax out of Carpeting for later!

How to get candle wax out of carpet

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2 Comments

  1. Thanks loads for the detailed workflow for removing candle wax from carpet. It is in my office carpet and is driving me insane. I knew I needed an iron but now I have a fool proof method to get the wax out and leave no stain. BRAVO!

    1. Katie Berry says:

      Glad to have helped!

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